REFRAMING: The Generic Instruction Request

reframing-POST

Welcome to an occasional series I’m calling REFRAMING. The idea behind the series is to take some common pain points for librarians and turn them around. You might as well call it “The Flip.” What I’m looking to do is take scenarios that are usually considered challenges and flip them into opportunities. This is an outgrowth of the work I currently do in supporting teaching librarians. It is, of course, just my own perspective, but I think there’s a lot of room in the world (especially today’s world?) for reframing. I’m an action oriented individual, and rather than wallowing in difficulty, I strive to look for the chance to do something about it, even if that something is just changing the way I’m thinking. Let’s consider the generic instruction request.

Here’s an accurate description, courtesy of a colleague: “We really need you to come do an instruction session. There’s no research assignment, but they are engaged in working on types of research for various other professors. Oh! And I won’t be there…” We’ve all been here, or some variation of here. These types of requests seem to be the bane of a librarian’s existence judging from conference and coffee break conversation. They feel disrespectful of our time and expertise. Convenient for the professor (the word “babysitter” comes to mind) but ultimately unhelpful for students. We mourn how much better a session could be with deliberate placement in the course, with some collaboration with the faculty member, with a damn assignment. Many librarians feel they can’t say no to this kind of request and resentment builds. In the instance of my colleague, above, she said that she already knew she was going to say yes, but that she struggled with how it felt. What to do? Put together a class while feeling disrespected or resentful?

First, let me say that “not at this time” is a valid response to this kind of request. Your time and expertise are valuable and possibly not best used by fulfilling this request in the spirit in which it was requested; however, there are reasons why you might say yes. I find that there is often a period of time at the beginning of a new job where you say yes to things that you don’t ultimately plan to say yes to in the long term, such as this kind of request. For one thing, these sessions can be really useful for learning about students and making connections with faculty that you later try to shift in a different direction. Ultimately, what we have here is an opportunity disguised as a challenge.

Here’s what I said to my colleague: “This kind of thing can be either a sad occurrence or a huge opportunity for you to do exactly whatever it is that you want to do and feel is most important without feeling like you have to meet faculty expectations. What do you think would be fun/necessary? Have you been itching to try something out? Talk about a concept? Fill in a blank? This is your opportunity. This is a place that the particular Frames you feel are important but underrepresented could find life. You’ve been given a whole class period to do exactly what you want. What do you want to do?

What might happen if we got excited about this kind of request instead of feeling obligated to it?

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