Reading Lately

bookstack

This summer I’ve read three books for professional development. I consider it professional development (and even included a list of professional books read on my promotion portfolio for my previous position) because they directly inform the work I do and the thoughts I think about the work I do, as you’ll see below. Here are the three books I’ve read this summer, in reverse chronological order:

Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think about Information Literacy, edited by Troy A. Swanson and Heather Jagman. I’ve been working on this one, off and on, for more than a year, and finally buckled down to finish it. The book is a mix of theory-based essays, philosophical meanderings, and practical how-tos. I found particular resonance with the chapter “Librarianspeak: Metaphors that Reflect (and Shape) the Ethos and Practice of Academic Librarianship” by MaryBeth Meszaros and Alison M. Lewis. This chapter informed my recent essay in C&RL News, “Words Matter.”

Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning by James M. Lang. I picked this one up on recommendation for a non-library blog I follow. The premise of the book is that small changes create big results. The content is based in the science of learning but has a strongly practical bent. Many ideas are most easily implemented in a full-semester course, but others are adaptable to a library context. I used a few suggestions in a professional development workshop I presented to our Teaching Librarians Community recently titled First 10/Last 10. On this blog, you may hear more reflection from me on Chapter 3: Interleaving. This book has the benefit of being written in Plain English (not High Academese) and therefore is a fast, easy read.

Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions by Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana. This book breaks down an approach to teaching students how to ask questions, called the Question Formulation Technique. The examples in the book are in the K-12 arena, though the authors have successfully used this technique for adult learners too. Basically, its a way to base a classroom in inquiry. It’s an extremely practical book, and one that could be transformative for many teachers and professors. I’m not sure yet how I would apply this information to a library context; however, I think I may use this technique in the library instruction class I’m teaching this spring for the Library School.

I keep a reading habit going by taking small chunks daily and scheduling it into my day. I definitely make reading goals for down times of the year like January and summer. I keep smaller goals for other times of the year. When work is just too hectic, I back off and feed off the “fat” of slower times. Typically, my goal is to read one chapter (or article, if that’s your jam) per day, approximately 4 per week. Sticking to this schedule, my reading takes an average of 20 minutes a day (~80 minutes per week), and allows me to finish a book in about a month – a pretty good clip achieved in small moments. Personally, I do better with small daily goals, rather than reading for 80 minutes straight.

I also read quite a bit in my personal life in small chunks. This year I started keeping track using my private Instagram account. I don’t know if it’s because of keeping track, listening to the What Should I Read Next podcast, or simple luck, but I’m having an extremely enjoyable reading year. I’ve also been listening to audiobooks, which has been one of the joys of my year. I’m quite picky about narrators, so I only listen on direct recommendation for audio versions particularly. You’ll see those noted below. Here are the top few of my year (so far):

What are you reading? Any recommendations for me?

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